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Comment on Inverse problem from discrete spectrum in the $D=2$ dimensional space (2014 \textit{Phys. Scr.} \textbf{989} 085201. (arXiv:2104.08102v1 [quant-ph])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

We analyse a method for the construction of the potential-energy function from the moments of the ground-state density. The sum rule on which some expressions are based appear to be wrong, as well as the moments and potential-energy functions derived for some illustrative examples.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Coherent control in atomic chains: to trap and release a traveling excitation. (arXiv:2104.08121v1 [quant-ph])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

We introduce a protocol for dynamical dispersion engineering in an atomic chain consisting of an ordered array of multi-level atoms with subwavelength lattice constant. This chain supports dark states that are protected from dissipation in the form of photon emission and can be understood as propagating spin waves traveling along the array. By using an external control field with a spatially-varying elliptical polarization we correlate internal and external degrees of freedom of the array in a controllable way. The coherent control over the atomic states translates into control over the group velocity of the spin waves. A traveling excitation can be stored and released without dissipation by adiabatically changing the control field amplitude. This protocol is an alternative to the more conventional electromagnetically-induced transparency, and exemplifies the rich physics born of the interplay between coherent control and correlated decay.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Room temperature single-photon emitters in silicon nitride. (arXiv:2104.08128v1 [physics.app-ph])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

Single-photon emitters are essential for enabling several emerging applications in quantum information technology, quantum sensing and quantum communication. Scalable photonic platforms capable of hosting intrinsic or directly embedded sources of single-photon emission are of particular interest for the realization of integrated quantum photonic circuits. Here, we report on the first-time observation of room-temperature single-photon emitters in silicon nitride (SiN) films grown on silicon dioxide substrates. As SiN has recently emerged as one of the most promising materials for integrated quantum photonics, the proposed platform is suitable for scalable fabrication of quantum on-chip devices. Photophysical analysis reveals bright (>$10^5$ counts/s), stable, linearly polarized, and pure quantum emitters in SiN films with the value of the second-order autocorrelation function at zero time delay $g^{(2)}(0)$ below 0.2 at room temperatures. The emission is suggested to originate from a specific defect center in silicon nitride due to the narrow wavelength distribution of the observed luminescence peak. Single-photon emitters in silicon nitride have the potential to enable direct, scalable and low-loss integration of quantum light sources with the well-established photonic on-chip platform.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Robust quantum classifier with minimal overhead. (arXiv:2104.08148v1 [quant-ph])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

To witness quantum advantages in practical settings, substantial efforts are required not only at the hardware level but also on theoretical research to reduce the computational cost of a given protocol. Quantum computation has the potential to significantly enhance existing classical machine learning methods, and several quantum algorithms for binary classification based on the kernel method have been proposed. These algorithms rely on estimating an expectation value, which in turn requires an expensive quantum data encoding procedure to be repeated many times. In this work, we calculate explicitly the number of repetition necessary for acquiring a fixed success probability and show that the Hadamard-test and the swap-test circuits achieve the optimal variance in terms of the quantum circuit parameters. The variance, and hence the number of repetition, can be further reduced only via optimization over data-related parameters. We also show that the kernel-based binary classification can be performed with a single-qubit measurement regardless of the number and the dimension of the data. Finally, we show that for a number of relevant noise models the classification can be performed reliably without quantum error correction. Our findings are useful for designing quantum classification experiments under limited resources, which is the common challenge in the noisy intermediate-scale quantum era.

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Experimental assessment of physical realism in wave and particle quantum controlled complementarity. (arXiv:2104.08152v1 [quant-ph])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

The quantum version of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment challenges interpretations of the complementarity principle based on post-quantum variables. With basis on the visibility at the output of a quantum controlled interferometer, a conceptual framework has been put forward which detaches the notions of wave and particle from the quantum state and allows for the existence of hybrid wave-particle behaviours, thus claiming for a critical review of the complementarity principle. Here, we propose and implement a contrast experimental setup which, upon analysis of an operational criterion of physical reality, proves to yield a dramatically different state of affairs. We show that, in disparity with previous proposals, our setup (i) ensures a formal link between the visibility and elements of reality within the interferometer, (ii) unveils the role of quantum correlations for wave-particle duality, and (iii) predicts the existence of hybrid elements of reality interpolating between wave and particle. An experimental proof-of-principle is provided for a two-spin-1/2 system in an interferometric setup implemented in a nuclear magnetic resonance platform. Furthermore, our results validate, to a great extent, Bohr's original formulation of the complementarity principle.

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Density of States of the lattice Schwinger model. (arXiv:2104.08170v1 [hep-lat])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

Using a recently introduced tensor network method, we study the density of states of the lattice Schwinger model, a standard testbench for lattice gauge theory numerical techniques, but also the object of recent experimental quantum simulations. We identify regimes of parameters where the spectrum appears to be symmetric and displays the expected continuum properties even for finite lattice spacing and number of sites. However, we find that for moderate system sizes and lattice spacing of $ga\sim O(1)$, the spectral density can exhibit very different properties with a highly asymmetric form. We also explore how the method can be exploited to extract thermodynamic quantities.

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Predicting ground state, excited states and long-time evolution of many-body systems from short-time evolution on a quantum computer. (arXiv:2104.08181v1 [quant-ph])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

The generating function of a Hamiltonian $H$ is defined as $F(t)=\langle e^{-itH}\rangle$, where $t$ is the time and where the expectation value is taken on a given initial quantum state. This function gives access to the different moments of the Hamiltonian $\langle H^{K}\rangle$ at various orders $K$. With the constraint of minimizing the quantum resources needed on near-term quantum computers, we show that the evaluation of the generating function can be made with only one extra ancillary qubit. Due to the limited stability of actual quantum devices, the function $F(t)$ can a priori be estimated on a restricted time interval limiting automatically the orders of the moments that could be computed. Despite of this current limitation and even with a small number of moments, a post-processing on classical computers can be used to predict approximate ground or excited state energies and/or approximate long-time evolutions. This post-processing can be achieved using methods based on the Krylov space and/or on the $t$-expansion approach that is based on imaginary time evolution. Hybrid quantum-classical calculations are illustrated in many-body interacting systems using the pairing and Fermi-Hubbard models. Possible extensions using symmetry breaking and restoration as well as a multi-reference framework are discussed.

Categories: Journals, Physics

High-quality level-crossing resonances under counterpropagating circularly polarized light waves for applications in atomic magnetometry. (arXiv:2104.08192v1 [physics.atom-ph])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

Level-crossing (LC) resonances in a buffer-gas-filled cesium vapor cell are studied under counterpropagating pump and probe light waves with opposite circular polarizations. The waves excite the D$_1$-line ground-state level $F_g$$=\,$$4$, while a transverse magnetic field (${\rm B}_x$$\perp$${\rm k}$) is scanned around zero to observe the resonance of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). It is shown that adding the pump light wave significantly improves the properties of the resonances in comparison with the commonly used scheme with a single light wave. As far as a small vapor cell ($\approx\,$0.1 cm$^3$) at relatively low temperature ($\approx\,$45-60$\,^\circ$C) is utilized, the results have good prospects for developing a low-power miniaturized atomic magnetometer.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Local and scalable detection of genuine multipartite single-photon path entanglement. (arXiv:2104.08216v1 [quant-ph])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

How can a multipartite single-photon path-entangled state be certified efficiently by means of local measurements? We address this question by constructing an entanglement witness based on local photon detections preceded by displacement operations to reveal genuine multipartite entanglement. Our witness is defined as a sum of two observables that can be measured locally and assessed with two measurement settings for any number of parties $N$. For any bipartition, the maximum mean value of the witness observable over biseparable states is bounded from the maximal eigenvalue of an $N\times N$ matrix, which can be computed efficiently. We demonstrate the applicability of our scheme by experimentally testing the witness for heralded 4- and 8-partite single-photon path-entangled states. Our implementation shows the scalability of our witness and opens the door for distributing photonic multipartite entanglement in quantum networks at high rates.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Valley splittings in Si/SiGe quantum dots with a germanium spike in the silicon well. (arXiv:2104.08232v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

Silicon-germanium heterostructures have successfully hosted quantum dot qubits, but the intrinsic near-degeneracy of the two lowest valley states poses an obstacle to high fidelity quantum computing. We present a modification to the Si/SiGe heterostructure by the inclusion of a spike in germanium concentration within the quantum well in order to increase the valley splitting. The heterostructure is grown by chemical vapor deposition and magnetospectroscopy is performed on gate-defined quantum dots to measure the excited state spectrum. We demonstrate a large and widely tunable valley splitting as a function of applied vertical electric field and lateral dot confinement. We further investigate the role of the germanium spike by means of tight-binding simulations in single-electron dots and show a robust doubling of the valley splitting when the spike is present, as compared to a standard (spike-free) heterostructure. This doubling effect is nearly independent of the electric field, germanium content of the spike, and spike location. This experimental evidence of a stable, tunable quantum dot, despite a drastic change to the heterostructure, provides a foundation for future heterostructure modifications.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Intense optical parametric amplification in dispersion engineered nanophotonic lithium niobate waveguides. (arXiv:2104.08262v1 [physics.optics])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

Strong amplification in integrated photonics is one of the most desired optical functionalities for computing, communications, sensing, and quantum information processing. Semiconductor gain and cubic nonlinearities, such as four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering, have been among the most studied amplification mechanisms on chip. Alternatively, material platforms with strong quadratic nonlinearities promise numerous advantages with respect to gain and bandwidth, among which nanophotonic lithium niobate is one of the most promising candidates. Here, we combine quasi-phase matching with dispersion engineering in nanophotonic lithium niobate waveguides and achieve intense optical parametric amplification. We measure a broadband phase-sensitive amplification larger than 45 dB/cm in a 2.5-mm-long waveguide. We further confirm a gain exceeding 100 dB/cm that spans over 600 nm of bandwidth around 2 $\mu$m by amplifying vacuum fluctuations to macroscopic levels in a 6-mm-long waveguide. Our results unlock new possibilities for on-chip few-cycle nonlinear optics, mid-infrared photonics, and quantum photonics.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Near-Ideal Quantum Efficiency with a Floquet Mode Traveling Wave Parametric Amplfier. (arXiv:2104.08269v1 [quant-ph])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

Broadband quantum-limited amplifiers would advance applications in quantum information processing, metrology, and astronomy. However, conventional traveling-wave parametric amplifiers (TWPAs) support broadband amplification at the cost of increased added noise. In this work, we develop and apply a multi-mode, quantum input-output theory to quantitatively identify the sidebands as a primary noise mechanism in all conventional TWPAs. We then propose an adiabatic Floquet mode scheme that effectively eliminates the sideband-induced noise and subsequently overcomes the trade-off between quantum efficiency (QE) and bandwidth. We then show that a Floquet mode Josephson traveling-wave parametric amplifier implementation can simultaneously achieve $>20\,$dB gain and a QE of $\eta/\eta_{\mathrm{ideal}}> 99.9\%$ of the quantum limit over more than an octave of bandwidth. Crucially, Floquet mode TWPAs also strongly suppress the nonlinear forward-backward wave coupling and are therefore genuinely directional. Floquet mode TWPAs can thus be directly integrated on-chip without isolators, making near-perfect measurement efficiency possible. The proposed Floquet scheme is also widely applicable to other platforms such as kinetic inductance traveling-wave amplifiers and optical parametric amplifiers.

Categories: Journals, Physics

SYK meets non-Hermiticity II: measurement-induced phase transition. (arXiv:2104.08270v1 [cond-mat.str-el])

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

We construct Brownian Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) chains subjected to continuous monitoring and explore possible entanglement phase transitions therein. We analytically derive the effective action in the large-$N$ limit and show that an entanglement transition is caused by the symmetry breaking in the enlarged replica space. In the noninteracting case with SYK$_2$ chains, the model features a continuous $O(2)$ symmetry between two replicas and a transition corresponding to spontaneous breaking of that symmetry upon varying the measurement rate. In the symmetry broken phase at low measurement rate, the emergent replica criticality associated with the Goldstone mode leads to a log-scaling entanglement entropy that can be attributed to the free energy of vortices. In the symmetric phase at higher measurement rate, the entanglement entropy obeys area-law scaling. In the interacting case, the continuous $O(2)$ symmetry is explicitly lowered to a discrete $C_4$ symmetry, giving rise to volume-law entanglement entropy in the symmetry-broken phase due to the enhanced linear free energy cost of domain walls compared to vortices. The interacting transition is described by $C_4$ symmetry breaking. We also verify the large-$N$ critical exponents by numerically solving the Schwinger-Dyson equation.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Making Mistakes Saves the Single World of the Extended Wigner's Friend Experiment. (arXiv:1801.08537v3 [quant-ph] UPDATED)

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

The Extended Wigner's Friend thought experiment comprising a quantum system containing an agent who draws conclusions, upon observing the outcome of a measurement of a quantum state prepared in two non-orthogonal versions by another agent led its authors to conclude that quantum theory cannot consistently describe the use of itself. It has also been proposed that this thought experiment is equivalent to coherent entangled state (Bell type) experiments. It is argued in this paper that the assumption of the freedom of choice of the first Wigner's friend regarding how to prepare a quantum state in one of the two available non-orthogonal versions invalidates such equivalency.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Quantum walks: Schur functions meet symmetry protected topological phases. (arXiv:1903.07494v2 [math-ph] UPDATED)

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

This paper uncovers and exploits a link between a central object in harmonic analysis, the so-called Schur functions, and the very hot topic of symmetry protected topological phases of quantum matter. This connection is found in the setting of quantum walks, i.e. quantum analogs of classical random walks. We prove that topological indices classifying symmetry protected topological phases of quantum walks are encoded by matrix Schur functions built out of the walk. This main result of the paper reduces the calculation of these topological indices to a linear algebra problem: calculating symmetry indices of finite-dimensional unitaries obtained by evaluating such matrix Schur functions at the symmetry protected points $\pm1$. The Schur representation fully covers the complete set of symmetry indices for 1D quantum walks with a group of symmetries realizing any of the symmetry types of the tenfold way. The main advantage of the Schur approach is its validity in the absence of translation invariance, which allows us to go beyond standard Fourier methods, leading to the complete classification of non-translation invariant phases for typical examples.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Nonuniform Families of Polynomial-Size Quantum Finite Automata and Quantum Logarithmic-Space Computation with Polynomial-Size Advice. (arXiv:1907.02916v4 [cs.FL] UPDATED)

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

The state complexity of a finite(-state) automaton intuitively measures the size of the description of the automaton. Sakoda and Sipser [STOC 1972, pp. 275--286] were concerned with nonuniform families of finite automata and they discussed the behaviors of the nonuniform complexity classes defined by such families of finite automata having polynomial-size state complexity. In a similar fashion, we introduce nonuniform state complexity classes using nonuniform families of quantum finite automata empowered by the flexible use of garbage tapes. We first present general inclusion and separation relationships among nonuniform state complexity classes of various one-way finite automata, including deterministic, nondeterministic, probabilistic, and quantum finite automata having polynomially many inner states. For two-way quantum finite automata equipped with flexible garbage tapes, we show a close relationship between the nonuniform state complexity of the family of such polynomial-size quantum finite automata and the parameterized complexity class induced by logarithmic-space quantum computation assisted by polynomial-size advice. We further establish a direct connection between space-bounded quantum computation with quantum advice and quantum finite automata whose transitions are dictated by superpositions of transition tables.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Efficient learning of quantum noise. (arXiv:1907.13022v2 [quant-ph] UPDATED)

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

Noise is the central obstacle to building large-scale quantum computers. Quantum systems with sufficiently uncorrelated and weak noise could be used to solve computational problems that are intractable with current digital computers. There has been substantial progress towards engineering such systems. However, continued progress depends on the ability to characterize quantum noise reliably and efficiently with high precision. Here we describe such a protocol and report its experimental implementation on a 14-qubit superconducting quantum architecture. The method returns an estimate of the effective noise and can detect correlations within arbitrary sets of qubits. We show how to construct a quantum noise correlation matrix allowing the easy visualization of correlations between all pairs of qubits, enabling the discovery of long-range two-qubit correlations in the 14 qubit device that had not previously been detected. Our results are the first implementation of a provably rigorous and comprehensive diagnostic protocol capable of being run on state of the art devices and beyond. These results pave the way for noise metrology in next-generation quantum devices, calibration in the presence of crosstalk, bespoke quantum error-correcting codes, and customized fault-tolerance protocols that can greatly reduce the overhead in a quantum computation.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Quantifying The Uncertainty Principle and The Effects of Minimal Length From a Finite-Dimensional Perspective. (arXiv:2002.01564v4 [quant-ph] UPDATED)

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

It is well known that due to the uncertainty principle the Planck constant sets a resolution boundary in phase space, and the resulting trade-off in resolutions between incompatible measurements has been thoroughly investigated. It is also known that in the classical regime sufficiently coarse measurements of position and momentum can simultaneously be determined. However, when we independently vary the resolutions of incompatible measurements, the picture of how the uncertainty principle transitions between the quantum and classical regimes is not so vivid. In the present work we will clarify this picture by studying certain probabilities that quantify the effects of the uncertainty principle. Since it is also expected that the uncertainty principle will be modified by the existence of minimal length in space, we will conduct our investigation on a lattice. We will show how these probabilities are modified by the lattice, and demonstrate the close relationship between the uncertainty principle and minimal length from a finite-dimensional perspective.

Categories: Journals, Physics

Transition Probabilities for Flavor Eigenstates of Non-Hermitian Hamiltonians in the PT-Broken Phase. (arXiv:2002.05499v2 [quant-ph] UPDATED)

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

We investigate the transition probabilities for the "flavor" eigenstates in the two-level quantum system, which is described by a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian with the parity and time-reversal (PT) symmetry. Particularly, we concentrate on the so-called PT-broken phase, where two eigenvalues of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian turn out to be a complex conjugate pair. In this case, we find that the transition probabilities will be unbounded in the limit of infinite time $t \to +\infty$. However, after performing a connection between a non-Hermitian system, which exhibits passive PT-symmetry and global decay, and the neutral-meson system in particle physics, we observe that the diverging behavior of the transition probabilities is actually applicable to the gauge-transformed neutral-meson states, whereas the transition probabilities for physical states are exponentially suppressed by the global decay. We also present a brief review on the situation at the so-called exceptional point, where both the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian coalesce.

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Fractalizing quantum codes. (arXiv:2009.01252v2 [quant-ph] UPDATED)

Mon, 2021-04-19 10:45

We introduce "fractalization", a procedure by which spin models are extended to higher-dimensional "fractal" spin models. This allows us to interpret type-II fracton phases, fractal symmetry-protected topological phases, and more, in terms of well understood lower-dimensional spin models. Fractalization is also useful for deriving new spin models and quantum codes from known ones. We construct higher dimensional generalizations of fracton models that host extended fractal excitations. Finally, by applying fractalization to a 2D subsystem code, we produce a family of locally generated 3D subsystem codes that are conjectured to saturate a quantum information storage tradeoff bound.

Categories: Journals, Physics