Quantum Computation

Quantum Transport (QT)

Research Type: 
Theory

The group works on theoretical problems in quantum transport. Central research topics include quantum engineering with dynamic single-electron sources as well as electrical noise and fluctuations in nano-scale conductors. We are also interested in correlations and entanglement in many-body systems as well as the statistical mechanics of small quantum devices.

Leader: 
Prof. Christian Flindt

Quantum Computing and Devices (QCD)

Research Type: 
Theory
Experiment

QCD group carries out experimental research on silicon and superconducting quantum nanoelectronics. The main research goals include engineered quantum environments, single-electron pumps, and microwave photon detectors. In addition, QCD is known for its work on monopoles in ultracold atomic gases.

Leader: 
Doc. Mikko Möttönen

MICROPHOTON

Full Name: 
Measurement and control of single-photon microwave radiation on a chip
Coordinator: 
Antti Manninen
Running time: 
2013-06-01 - 2016-05-31

We now have the ability to build electronic devices at the nanoscale and operate them at millikelvin temperatures, and this has opened up the possibility to design, operate and utilise devices based on quantum physics. Quantum devices have been used in electrical metrology for decades and now nanoscale single-electron current sources are about to take their place in the realization of the ampere.

QUESS

Full Name: 
Quantum Environment Engineering for Steered Systems
Coordinator: 
Mikko Möttönen
Running time: 
2017-01-01 - 2021-12-31

The superconducting quantum computer has very recently reached the theoretical thresholds for fault-tolerant universal quantum computing and a quantum annealer based on superconducting quantum bits, qubits, is already commercially available. However, several fundamental questions on the way to efficient large-scale quantum computing have to be answered: qubit initialization, extreme gate accuracy, and quantum-level power consumption.

SINGLEOUT

Full Name: 
Single-Photon Microwave Devices: era of quantum optics outside cavities
Coordinator: 
Mikko Möttönen
Running time: 
2012-01-01 - 2016-12-31

The past couple of years have witnessed the rise of on-chip quantum optics. This has been enabled by the fabrication of high-finesse superconducting resonators made out of coplanar waveguides, and by the coupling of these resonators to superconducting quantum bits, qubits. This so-called circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) has proven superior compared with the standard cavity QED with photons coupled to atoms in three-dimensional space.

HEATTRONICS

Full Name: 
Mesoscopic heattronics: thermal and nonequilibrium effects and fluctuations in nanoelectronics
Coordinator: 
Tero Heikkilä
Running time: 
2010-01-01 - 2015-12-31

Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology Research Group at the University of Southampton

Research Type: 
Theory
Experiment

Our expertise is to fabricate various nano-electronic devices using our £120M clean room complex, the Southampton Nanofabrication Centre (http://www.southampton-nanofab.com) opened in 2009, one of the best university-based fabrication facilities in Europe. The cleanroom supports cutting-edge research activities in nano-electronics, photonics, and fibre optics. The full CMOS front-end and backend process tools are available for 6-inch wafers.

Leader: 
Professor Shinichi Saito

Fault tolerant dynamical decoders for topological quantum memories

Date: 
2015-11-01 - 2016-06-20
Author(s): 

M. Herold, M. J. Kastoryano, E. T. Campbell, J. Eisert

Reference: 

arXiv:1511.05579

Active error correction of topological quantum codes - in particular the toric code - remains one of the most viable routes to large scale quantum information processing. In this work, we introduce the concept of a dynamical decoder as a promising route for achieving fault-tolerant quantum memories.

Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (QuAIL) @ NASA, Ames

Research Type: 
Theory
Experiment
Leader: 
Andre G. Petukhov, Eleanor G. Rieffel

Quantum computations on a topologically encoded qubit

Date: 
2016-06-07
Author(s): 

D. Nigg, M. Müller, E. A. Martinez, P. Schindler, M. Hennrich, T. Monz, M. A. Martin-Delgado, R. Blatt

Reference: 

Science 345, 302 (2014)

The construction of a quantum computer remains a fundamental scientific and technological challenge because of the influence of unavoidable noise. Quantum states and operations can be protected from errors through the use of protocols for quantum computing with faulty components. We present a quantum error-correcting code in which one qubit is encoded in entangled states distributed over seven trapped-ion qubits. The code can detect one bit flip error, one phase flip error, or a combined error of both, regardless on which of the qubits they occur.

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