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Extracting entanglement from identical particles

Date: 
2013-12-16
Author(s): 

N. Killoran, M. Cramer and M. B. Plenio

Reference: 

Physical Review Letters 112, 150501 (2014)

Identical particles and entanglement are both fundamental components of quantum mechanics. However, when identical particles are condensed in a single spatial mode, the standard notions of entanglement, based on clearly identifiable subsystems, break down. This has led many to conclude that such systems have limited value for quantum information tasks, compared to distinguishable particle systems.

Superconducting Circuits for Quantum Simulation of Dynamical Gauge Fields

Date: 
2013-09-13 - 2014-01-22
Author(s): 

D. Marcos, P. Rabl, E. Rico, P. Zoller

Reference: 

Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 110504 (2013)

We describe a superconducting-circuit lattice design for the implementation and simulation of dynamical lattice gauge theories. We illustrate our proposal by analyzing a one-dimensional U(1) quantum-link model, where superconducting qubits play the role of matter fields on the lattice sites and the gauge fields are represented by two coupled microwave resonators on each link between neighboring sites.

Spread of correlations in long-range interacting quantum systems

Date: 
2013-11-12 - 2014-01-22
Author(s): 

P. Hauke, L. Tagliacozzo

Reference: 

Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 207202 (2013)

The nonequilibrium response of a quantum many-body system defines its fundamental transport properties and how initially localized quantum information spreads. However, for long-range-interacting quantum systems little is known. We address this issue by analyzing a local quantum quench in the long-range Ising model in a transverse field, where interactions decay as a variable power law with distance.

Braiding of Atomic Majorana Fermions in Wire Networks and Implementation of the Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm

Date: 
2013-11-11 - 2014-01-22
Author(s): 

C. V. Kraus, P. Zoller, M. A. Baranov

Reference: 

Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 203001 (2013)

We propose an efficient protocol for braiding Majorana fermions realized as edge states in atomic wire networks, and demonstrate its robustness against experimentally relevant errors. The braiding of two Majorana fermions located on one side of two adjacent wires requires only a few local operations on this side which can be implemented using local site addressing available in current experiments with cold atoms and molecules. Based on this protocol we provide an experimentally feasible implementation of the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm for two qubits in a topologically protected way.

Scalable Reconstruction of Density Matrices

Date: 
2012-07-06 - 2013-07-11
Author(s): 

T. Baumgratz, D. Gross, M. Cramer and M.B. Plenio

Reference: 

Physical Review Letters 111, 020401 (2013)

Recent contributions in the field of quantum state tomography have shown that, despite the exponential growth of Hilbert space with the number of subsystems, tomography of one-dimensional quantum systems may still be performed efficiently by tailored reconstruction schemes. Here, we discuss a scalable method to reconstruct mixed states that are well approximated by matrix product operators. The reconstruction scheme only requires local information about the state, giving rise to a reconstruction technique that is scalable in the system size.

Chemical Compass Model for Avian Magnetoreception as a Quantum Coherent Device

Date: 
2013-05-12 - 2013-12-04
Author(s): 

J.M. Cai and M.B. Plenio

Reference: 

Physical Review Letters 111, 230503 (2013)

It is known that more than 50 species use the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation. Intensive studies, particularly behavior experiments with birds, provide support for a chemical compass based on magnetically sensitive free radical reactions as a source of this sense. However, the fundamental question of how quantum coherence plays an essential role in such a chemical compass model of avian magnetoreception yet remains controversial.

Dissipative production of a maximally entangled steady state of two quantum bits

Date: 
2013-12-19 - 2014-01-16
Author(s): 

Y. Lin,
J. P. Gaebler,
F. Reiter,
T. R. Tan,
R. Bowler,
A. S. Sørensen,
D. Leibfried
& D. J. Wineland

Reference: 

Nature 504, 415–418 (19 December 2013)

Entangled states are a key resource in fundamental quantum physics, quantum cryptography and quantum computation. Introduction of controlled unitary processes—quantum gates—to a quantum system has so far been the most widely used method to create entanglement deterministically. These processes require high-fidelity state preparation and minimization of the decoherence that inevitably arises from coupling between the system and the environment, and imperfect control of the system parameters.

Nondestructive Detection of an Optical Photon

Date: 
2013-12-13
Author(s): 

Andreas Reiserer, Stephan Ritter, Gerhard Rempe

Reference: 

Science 342, 1349 (2013)

All optical detectors to date annihilate photons upon detection, thus excluding repeated measurements. Here, we demonstrate a robust photon detection scheme that does not rely on absorption. Instead, an incoming photon is reflected from an optical resonator containing a single atom prepared in a superposition of two states. The reflection toggles the superposition phase, which is then measured to trace the photon. Characterizing the device with faint laser pulses, a single-photon detection efficiency of 74% and a survival probability of 66% are achieved.

Ground-State Cooling of a Single Atom at the Center of an Optical Cavity

Date: 
2013-05-30
Author(s): 

A. Reiserer, C. Nölleke, S. Ritter, G. Rempe

Reference: 

Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 223003 (2013)

A single neutral atom is trapped in a three-dimensional optical lattice at the center of a high-finesse optical resonator. Using fluorescence imaging and a shiftable standing-wave trap, the atom is deterministically loaded into the maximum of the intracavity field where the atom-cavity coupling is strong. After 5 ms of Raman sideband cooling, the three-dimensional motional ground state is populated with a probability of (89+/-2)%.

High fidelity spin entanglement using optimal control

Date: 
2014-02-28
Author(s): 

F. Dolde, V. Bergholm, Y. Wang, I. Jakobi, S. Pezzagna, J. Meijer, P. Neumann, T. Schulte-Herbrueggen, J. Biamonte, and J. Wrachtrup

Reference: 

Nature Communications 5, 3371 (2014)

Precise control of quantum systems is of fundamental importance in quantum information processing, quantum metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy. When scaling up quantum registers, several challenges arise: individual addressing of qubits while suppressing cross-talk, entangling distant nodes and decoupling unwanted interactions. Here we experimentally demonstrate optimal control of a prototype spin qubit system consisting of two proximal nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond. Using engineered microwave pulses, we demonstrate single electron spin operations with a fidelity F≈0.99.

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