QIPC

Expert group on Quantum Technology Flagship

Summary: 

Following the nomination of the chair, Prof. Mlynek, the Commission has now formally set-up the Commission Expert Group, with 13 very high level academic members, that will provide recommendations on the preparation of the Quantum Technology Flagship.

The Commission Expert Group on Quantum Technologies - High Level Steering Committee has now been established as a high level expert group with a mandate of one year. Its members will best represent collectively the diversity of stakeholders in Europe, both from the academic as from the industrial sides.

The group will be composed of the following academic members:

Simulating Quantum Spin Models using Rydberg-Excited Atomic Ensembles in Magnetic Microtrap Arrays

Date: 
2016-07-31
Author(s): 

Shannon Whitlock, Alexander W. Glaetzle, Peter Hannaford

Reference: 

arXiv:1608.00251

We propose a scheme to simulate lattice spin models based on strong and long-range interacting Rydberg atoms stored in a large-spacing array of magnetic microtraps.

Young Quantum Information Scientists (YQIS)

Date: 
2016-10-19 - 2016-10-21
Registration deadline: 
2016-09-23 (All day)
Place: 
Barcelona, Spain

We are pleased to announce the second edition of the international conference for Young Quantum Information Scientists (YQIS), that will

Laser damage creates backdoors in quantum communications

Date: 
2015-10-12 - 2016-06-17
Author(s): 

Vadim Makarov, Jean-Philippe Bourgoin, Poompong Chaiwongkhot, Mathieu Gagné, Thomas Jennewein, Sarah Kaiser, Raman Kashyap, Matthieu Legré, Carter Minshull, Shihan Sajeed

Reference: 

arXiv:1510.03148
submitted to PRL

Practical quantum communication (QC) protocols are assumed to be secure provided implemented devices are properly characterized and all known side channels are closed. We show that this is not always true. We demonstrate a laser-damage attack capable of modifying device behaviour on-demand. We test it on two practical QC systems for key distribution and coin-tossing, and show that newly created deviations lead to side channels. This reveals that laser damage can be a potential security risk to existing QC systems, and necessitates extensive countermeasure testing to guarantee security.

Laser damage creates backdoors in quantum communications

Date: 
2015-10-12 - 2016-06-17
Author(s): 

Vadim Makarov, Jean-Philippe Bourgoin, Poompong Chaiwongkhot, Mathieu Gagné, Thomas Jennewein, Sarah Kaiser, Raman Kashyap, Matthieu Legré, Carter Minshull, Shihan Sajeed

Reference: 

arXiv:1510.03148
submitted to PRL

Practical quantum communication (QC) protocols are assumed to be secure provided implemented devices are properly characterized and all known side channels are closed. We show that this is not always true. We demonstrate a laser-damage attack capable of modifying device behaviour on-demand. We test it on two practical QC systems for key distribution and coin-tossing, and show that newly created deviations lead to side channels. This reveals that laser damage can be a potential security risk to existing QC systems, and necessitates extensive countermeasure testing to guarantee security.

Gaps between industrial and academic solutions to implementation loopholes in QKD: testing random-detector-efficiency countermeasure in a commercial system

Date: 
2016-01-05 - 2016-06-17
Author(s): 

Anqi Huang, Shihan Sajeed, Poompong Chaiwongkhot, Mathilde Soucarros, Matthieu Legre, Vadim Makarov

Reference: 

arXiv:1601.00993
submitted to IEEE Journal of selected topics in quantum electronics

In the last decade, efforts have been made to reconcile theoretical security with realistic imperfect implementations of quantum key distribution (QKD). However, in the process gaps have recently emerged between academic and industrial approaches to closing loopholes created by implementation imperfections. In academic research labs, many practical security problems appear to be reliably solved, in principle, by advanced schemes and protocols. Meanwhile the industry prefers practical and easier solutions, even without security verification in some cases.

Quantum Spin Dimers from Chiral Dissipation in Cold-Atom Chains

Date: 
2014-08-19
Author(s): 

Tomás Ramos, Hannes Pichler, Andrew J. Daley, Peter Zoller

Reference: 

Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 237203 (2014)

We consider the non-equilibrium dynamics of a driven dissipative spin chain with chiral coupling to a 1D bosonic bath, and its atomic implementation with a two-species mixture of cold quantum gases. The reservoir is represented by a spin-orbit coupled 1D quasi-condensate of atoms in a magnetized phase, while the spins are identified with motional states of a separate species of atoms in an optical lattice.

Quantum Optics of Chiral Spin Networks

Date: 
2014-11-11
Author(s): 

Hannes Pichler, Tomás Ramos, Andrew J. Daley, Peter Zoller

Reference: 

Phys. Rev. A 91, 042116 (2015).

We study the driven-dissipative dynamics of a network of spin-1/2 systems coupled to one or more chiral 1D bosonic waveguides within the framework of a Markovian master equation. We determine how the interplay between a coherent drive and collective decay processes can lead to the formation of pure multipartite entangled steady states. The key ingredient for the emergence of these many-body dark states is an asymmetric coupling of the spins to left and right propagating guided modes.

Non-standard Hubbard models in optical lattices: a review

Date: 
2014-06-01
Author(s): 

Omjyoti Dutta, Mariusz Gajda, Philipp Hauke, Maciej Lewenstein, Dirk-Sören Lühmann, Boris A. Malomed, Tomasz Sowiński, Jakub Zakrzewski

Reference: 

Rep. Prog. Phys. 78, 066001 (2015)

Originally, the Hubbard model has been derived for describing the behaviour of strongly-correlated electrons in solids. However, since over a decade now, variations of it are also routinely being implemented with ultracold atoms in optical lattices. We review some of the rich literature on this subject, with a focus on more recent non-standard forms of the Hubbard model.

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