41.95.+m Quantum magnetometry

Quantum metrology enhanced by repetitive quantum error correction

Date: 
2016-02-23
Author(s): 

Thomas Unden, Priya Balasubramanian, Daniel Louzon, Yuval Vinkler, Martin B. Plenio, Matthew Markham, Daniel Twitchen, Igor Lovchinsky, Alexander O. Sushkov, Mikhail D. Lukin, Alex Retzker, Boris Naydenov, Liam P. McGuinness, Fedor Jelezko

Reference: 

arXiv:1602.07144

The accumulation of quantum phase in response to a signal is the central mechanism of quantum sensing, as such, loss of phase information presents a fundamental limitation. For this reason approaches to extend quantum coherence in the presence of noise are actively being explored. Here we experimentally protect a room-temperature hybrid spin register against environmental decoherence by performing repeated quantum error correction whilst maintaining sensitivity to signal fields.

Ultrasensitive magnetometer using a single atom

Date: 
2014-11-28
Author(s): 

I. Baumgart, J.-M. Cai, A. Retzker, M. B. Plenio, Ch. Wunderlich

Reference: 

arXiv:1411.7893

Precision sensing, and in particular high precision magnetometry, is a central goal of research into quantum technologies. For magnetometers often trade-offs exist between sensitivity, spatial resolution, and frequency range. The precision, and thus the sensitivity of magnetometry scales as 1/(T2)1/2 with the phase coherence time, T2, of the sensing system playing the role of a key determinant.

Improved Quantum Magnetometry beyond the Standard Quantum Limit

Date: 
2015-07-22
Author(s): 

J. B. Brask, R. Chaves, J. Kołodyński

Reference: 

Phys. Rev. X 5, 031010 (2015) http://arxiv.org/abs/1411.0716

Under ideal conditions, quantum metrology promises a precision gain over classical techniques scaling quadratically with the number of probe particles. At the same time, no-go results have shown that generic, uncorrelated noise limits the quantum advantage to a constant factor.

All-optical high-resolution magnetic resonance using a nitrogen-vacancy spin in diamond

Date: 
2014-04-04
Author(s): 

Z.-Y. Wang, J.-M. Cai, A. Retzker, M. B. Plenio

Reference: 

arXiv:1404.1190

We propose an all-optical scheme to prolong the quantum coherence of a negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. Optical control of the NV spin suppresses energy fluctuations of the 3A2 ground states and forms an energy gap protected subspace. By optical control, the spectral linewidth of magnetic resonance is much narrower and the measurement of the frequencies of magnetic field sources has higher resolution.

Chemical Compass Model for Avian Magnetoreception as a Quantum Coherent Device

Date: 
2013-05-12 - 2013-12-04
Author(s): 

J.M. Cai and M.B. Plenio

Reference: 

Physical Review Letters 111, 230503 (2013)

It is known that more than 50 species use the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation. Intensive studies, particularly behavior experiments with birds, provide support for a chemical compass based on magnetically sensitive free radical reactions as a source of this sense. However, the fundamental question of how quantum coherence plays an essential role in such a chemical compass model of avian magnetoreception yet remains controversial.

Magnetic hose: Routing and Long-distance Transportation of Magnetic Fields

Date: 
2013-04-23
Author(s): 

Carles Navau, Jordi Prat-Camps, Oriol Romero-Isart, J. Ignacio Cirac, Alvaro Sanchez

Reference: 

arXiv:1304.6300v1

Magnetism is a fundamental interaction shaping our physical world, at the basis of technologies such as magnetic recording or energy generation. Unlike electromagnetic waves, which can be routed and transmitted with waveguides to long distances, magnetic fields rapidly decay with distance.

Superconducting Vortex Lattices for Ultracold Atoms

Date: 
2013-02-14
Author(s): 

O. Romero-Isart, C. Navau, A. Sanchez, P. Zoller, J. I. Cirac

Reference: 

arXiv:1302.3504v1

The ability to trap and manipulate ultracold atoms in lattice structures has lead to a remarkable experimental progress to build quantum simulators for Hubbard models. A prominent example is atoms in optical lattices where lasers are used to create lattices with spacing set by the laser wavelength as well as to control and measure the many-body states.

Nanoplasmonic Lattices for Ultracold Atoms

Date: 
2012-12-06
Author(s): 

M. Gullans, T. Tiecke, D.E. Chang, J. Feist, J.D. Thompson, J.I. Cirac, P. Zoller, M.D. Lukin

Reference: 

Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 235309 (2012)
doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.235309

We propose to use subwavelength confinement of light associated with the near field of plasmonic systems to create nanoscale optical lattices for ultracold atoms. Our approach combines the unique coherence properties of isolated atoms with the subwavelength manipulation and strong light-matter interaction associated with nanoplasmonic systems. It allows one to considerably increase the energy scales in the realization of Hubbard models and to engineer effective long-range interactions in coherent and dissipative many-body dynamics.

Single-spin magnetometry with multi-pulse dynamical decoupling sequences

Date: 
2011-02-24
Author(s): 

G. de Lange, D. Ristè, V. V. Dobrovitski, R. Hanson

Reference: 

Physical Review Letters106, 080802

We experimentally demonstrate single-spin magnetometry with multipulse sensing sequences. The use of multipulse sequences can greatly increase the sensing time per measurement shot, resulting in enhanced ac magnetic field sensitivity. We theoretically derive and experimentally verify the optimal number of sensing cycles, for which the effects of decoherence and increased sensing time are balanced. We perform these experiments for oscillating magnetic fields with fixed phase as well as for fields with random phase.

Electric-field sensing using single diamond spins

Date: 
2011-04-17
Author(s): 

F. Dolde, H. Fedder, M. Doherty, T. Nöbauer, F. Rempp, G. Balasubramanian, T. Wolf, F. Reinhard, L. Hollenberg, F. Jelezko, J. Wrachtrup

Reference: 

Nature Physics, 7 (2011), pp 459 - 463
doi:10.1038/nphys1969

The ability to sensitively detect individual charges under ambient conditions would benefit a wide range of applications across disciplines. However, most current techniques are limited to low-temperature methods such as single-electron transistors, single-electron electrostatic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy. Here we introduce a quantum-metrology technique demonstrating precision three-dimensional electric-field measurement using a single nitrogen-vacancy defect centre spin in diamond. An a.c.

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