16.10.–p Condensed Matter: Physical qubits

Quantum magnetism of ultracold atoms with a dynamical pseudospin degree of freedom

Date: 
2014-01-29
Author(s): 

Tobias Graß, Alessio Celi, Maciej Lewenstein

Reference: 

arXiv:1401.7608

Emulating Solid-State Physics with a Hybrid System of Ultracold Ions and Atoms

Date: 
2013-08-20
Author(s): 

U. Bissbort, D. Cocks, A. Negretti, Z. Idziaszek, T. Calarco, F. Schmidt-Kaler; W. Hoffstetter, R. Gerritsma

Reference: 

URL: http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.080501
DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.080501
PACS: 03.67.Ac, 37.10.Ty, 71.10.Fd

We propose and theoretically investigate a hybrid system composed of a crystal of trapped ions coupled to a cloud of ultracold fermions. The ions form a periodic lattice and induce a band structure in the atoms. This system combines the advantages of high fidelity operations and detection offered by trapped ion systems with ultracold atomic systems.

Topological Qubits with Majorana Fermions in Trapped Ions

Date: 
2012-03-07
Author(s): 

A. Mezzacapo, J. Casanova, L. Lamata, and E. Solano

Reference: 

Submitted to Physical Review Letters (2011)

We propose a method of encoding a topologically-protected qubit using Majorana fermions in a trapped-ion chain. This qubit is protected against major sources of decoherence, while local operations and measurements can be easily realized. Furthermore, we show that an efficient quantum interface and memory for arbitrary multiqubit photonic states can be built, encoding them into a set of entangled Majorana-fermion (MF) qubits inside cavities.

Defect center room-temperature quantum processors

Date: 
2010-05-25
Author(s): 

J. Wrachtrup

Reference: 

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 107, 9479-9480 (21)

Quantum information devices promise unique opportunities in information technology. Physicists are intrigued with building such devices because they probe our understanding of the nature of quantum mechanics. Quantum effects, although providing the basis of atomic, molecular, and solid state physics, usually are not observed in everyday life because the highly fragile nature of coherence and entanglement requires extensive shielding against environmental effects.

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