15.10.–p Quantum Optics: Physical qubits

Experimental Implementation of the Optimal Linear-Optical Controlled Phase Gate

Date: 
2011-01-06
Author(s): 

Karel Lemr, A. Černoch, J. Soubusta, K. Kieling, J. Eisert, and M. Dušek

Reference: 

Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 013602 (2011)

Quantum register based on coupled electron spins in a room-temperature solid

Date: 
2010-02-28
Author(s): 

P. Neumann, R. Kolesov, B. Naydenov, J. Beck1, F. Rempp, M. Steiner, V. Jacques, G. Balasubramanian, M. L. Markham, D. J. Twitchen, S. Pezzagna, J. Meijer, J. Twamley, F. Jelezko & J. Wrachtrup

Reference: 

Nature Physics 6, 249-253 (2010)

Devices that harness the laws of quantum physics hold the promise for information processing that outperforms their classical counterparts, and for unconditionally secure communication. However, in particular, implementations based on condensed-matter systems face the challenge of short coherence times. Carbon materials, particularly diamond, however, are suitable for hosting robust solid-state quantum registers, owing to their spin-free lattice and weak spin–orbit coupling.

Single-Shot Readout of a Single Nuclear Spin

Date: 
2010-07-01
Author(s): 

Philipp Neumann, Johannes Beck, Matthias Steiner, Florian Rempp, Helmut Fedder, Philip R. Hemmer, Jörg Wrachtrup and Fedor Jelezko

Reference: 

Science 329 no. 5991 pp. 542-544

Projective measurement of single electron and nuclear spins has evolved from a gedanken experiment to a problem relevant for applications in atomic-scale technologies like quantum computing. Although several approaches allow for detection of a spin of single atoms and molecules, multiple repetitions of the experiment that are usually required for achieving a detectable signal obscure the intrinsic quantum nature of the spin’s behavior.

Quantum optics: A spooky light-emitting diode

Date: 
2010-08-01
Author(s): 

Val Zwiller

Reference: 

Nature Photonics 4, 508 - 509 (2010)

The generation of entangled photon pairs is usually a complex process involving optically driven schemes and nonlinear optics. The recent demonstration of an electrically powered light-emitting diode that is capable of this task looks set to greatly simplify experiments in the field of quantum information processing.

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