SOLID

Breakdown of the cross-Kerr scheme for photon counting...

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Breakdown of the cross Kerr scheme for photon counting

The Chalmers SOLID group recently published an article in Physical Review Letters in which they show, in the context of single-photon detection, that an atomic three-level model for a transmon in a transmission line does not support the predictions of the nonlinear polarizability model known as the cross-Kerr effect.

Coherence at a distance...

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Long distance coherent coupling in a quantum dot array

The group led by Lieven Vandersypen at TU-Delft recently published a paper in Nature Nanotechnology in which they show that two distant sites in an electrostatically defined quantum dot array can be tunnel-coupled directly. The coupling is mediated by virtual occupation of an intermediate site, with a strength that is controlled via the energy detuning of this site.

Entanglement by measurement in diamonds...

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Hanson group demonstrate entanglement by measurement in solid state qubits...

In a recent publication in Nature Physics the group led by SOLID partner Ronald Hanson realized a two-qubit parity measurement on nuclear spins localized near a nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond by exploiting an electron spin as a readout ancilla. The measurement enabled the group to project the initially uncorrelated nuclear spins into maximally entangled states.

Major advance in creating deterministic entanglement in solids

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Deterministic entanglement of superconudcting qubits by parity measurement and feedback

In a recent publication in Nature, the group led by Leo DiCarlo at SOLID partner TU-Delft have performed a time-resolved, continuous parity measurement of two superconducting qubits using the cavity in a three-dimensional circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture and phase-sensitive parametric amplification. Using postselection, the group managed to produce entanglement by parity measurement reaching 88 per cent fidelity to the closest Bell state.

SOLID researchers demonstrate entanglement between distant spins in diamond at room temperature

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Entanglement at room temperature in diamond

In a recent publication in Nature Nanotechnology, the group led by Jörg Wrachtrup experimentally demonstrated entanglement between two engineered single solid-state spin quantum bits (qubits) at ambient conditions. Photon emission of defect pairs reveals ground-state spin correlation. Entanglement (fidelity = 0.67±0.04) was proved by quantum state tomography.

Wallraff group demonstrate "Deterministic quantum teleportation"

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Wallraff group demonstrate deterministic quantum teleportation with feed-forward in a solid state system. 

Wrachtrup group sense single remote nuclear spins

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Wrachtrup group sense single remote nuclear spins

Photon-Mediated Interactions Between Distant Artificial Atoms

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Wallraff group demonstrate exchange interactions, superradiant states and subradiant states for two qubits placed two centimeters apart in an open one-dimensional space.

 

 

Ronald Hanson wins European physics prize

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SOLID partner Ronald Hanson is the 2012 recipient of the Nicholas Kurti European Science Prize.

 

Dr. Ronald Hanson from the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology is the 2012 recipient of the Nicholas Kurti European Science Prize. This prize is intended to recognise and promote outstanding achievements of young scientists in the field of physical sciences research and to support their career development. Hanson receives a €8000 cash prize, a unique trophy and certificate. He also has the opportunity to present his work at a conference of his choice.

Andreas Wallraff awarded an ERC Advanced Grant

Summary: 

An ERC Advanced Grant was awarded to Andreas Wallraff by the European Research Council (ERC) for the project "Superconducting Quantum Networks".

 From 2014, Wallraff will be using the funds awarded to him by the Advanced Grant to investigate ways of developing networks for computers that operate on the basis of quantum physics: quantum computers. The technology is based on integrated electronic circuits that use superconductive materials, and in which information is processed at microwave frequencies. The project focuses on the development of networks that can connect individual quantum chips at distances ranging from a few centimeters to several meters.

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